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Player Profile #165: Logan Morrison | 1B, OF | MIA

The tale of Logan Morrison is an all too common one — so much potential but so much disappointment. The absolute one thing I look for first when evaluating minor league talent is their strikeout-to-walk ratio, and Morrison has always excelled there. If only he’d spend more time worrying about his performance on the field instead of, well, you get the idea…

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Morrison is a personality. He’s baseball’s power Tweeter, and thanks to the gutting Marlins’ owner Jeffrey Loria gave his club this offseason, he’s also the second best offensive weapon Miami has. We got a glimpse of what Morrison is capable of back in 2011, and I’m willing to give him a pass for last season. But this will be year four in the big leagues, and sooner or later Morrison is going to have to produce.

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At a Glance

  • Strengths: BB, OBP
  • Neutral: R, HR, RBI, BA, SLG, OPS
  • Weaknesses: SB

Player Comparisons

  • Best-case scenario: Corey Hart (MIL)
  • Likely scenario: Will Middlebrooks (BOS), Andre Ethier (LAD), Brandon Moss (OAK)
  • Worst-case scenario: Delmon Young (FA)

Logan Morrison 2013 Fantasy Projection

With BABIPs of .265 and .248 in 2011 and 2012, respectively, Morrison was probably a little unlucky. Our xBA and xBABIP formulas suggest that Morrison did indeed deserve to hit for a better average than he did — and we’ve already seen the 20-25 homer power in two straight seasons. The fact that we named Corey Hart his best-case comparison says something of Morrison’s potential.

Can he figure it all out and right the ship? I think he will. It’s important to remember that Morrison is entering his fourth major league season and he just turned 25 this past August. Besides, he’s batting third in front of Giancarlo Stanton, and not many batters offer better lineup protection than Stanton.

In OBP leagues you can feel free to aggressively pursue Morrison. He walks a lot, and even if the batting average doesn’t fully rebound, he’ll walk enough to offset it. Given enough at-bats batting third, he’ll rack up an above average number of RBI, too, even if he has Juan Pierre and Placido Polanco setting the table for him.

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About the author: Bryan is the co-founder of Baseball Professor and works as a consultant specializing in operational metrics and efficiency analysis. When he’s not working, blogging, or tending to basic human needs, he enjoys pondering the vastness of the universe, rewatching episodes of Breaking Bad, and avoiding snakes. (@BaseballProf)

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